Le Club

Nadia Abu El-Haj

Nadia Abu El-Haj

Nadia Abu El-Haj is Professor in the Departments of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University, and Co-Director of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia. In addition to numerous journal articles published on topics ranging from the history of archaeology in Palestine to the question of race and genomics today, Abu El-Haj has published two books: Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society (2001), which won the Albert Hourani Annual Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association in 2002, and The Genealogical Science: The Search for Jewish Origins and the Politics of Epistemology (2012). She is currently working on a third book-length manuscript provisionally titled, The Ethics of Trauma: Moral Injury, Combat, and U.S. Empire.

Michael Behrent

Michael Behrent

Michael C. Behrent teaches modern European history at Appalachian State University (North Carolina).

Danielle Charette

Danielle Charette

Danielle Charette is a PhD Student with the University of Chicago's Committee on Social Thought, where she studies political theory. She graduated from Swarthmore College with a BA in English Literature.

Peter Coviello

Peter Coviello

Peter Coviello is Professor of English at the University of Illinois-Chicago, where he specializes in American literature and queer studies. He is the author of Intimacy in America: Dreams of Affiliation in Antebellum Literature (Minnesota, 2005), Tomorrow’s Parties: Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century America (NYU, 2013) – a finalist for a 2014 Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies – and, most recently, Long Players: A Love Story in Eighteen Songs (Penguin Books, 2018). His next book, Make Yourselves Gods: The Unfinished Business of American Secularism – A Mormon Story, is expected from the University of Chicago Press in 2019.

Tim Crane

Tim Crane

Tim Crane is a Professor of Philosophy at the Central European University, Budapest. He previously taught at UCL and the University of Cambridge, where he was Knightbridge Professor of Philosophy. He founded the Institute of Philosophy in the University of London in 2005. He has written a number of books on the nature of the mind, on metaphysics and on religion and religious belief. His most recent book is The Meaning of Belief (Harvard University Press 2017). He is the Philosophy Consultant Editor of the TLS.

Julia Dehm

Julia Dehm

Julia Dehm is a Lecturer at the La Trobe Law School, Melbourne, Australia. Her research addresses international climate change law and regulation, transnational carbon markets and the governance of natural resources as well as human rights issues. Prior to starting at La Trobe Julia was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice at the University of Texas in Austin and a Resident Fellow at the Harvard Law School Institute for Global Law and Policy. Her work has been published in the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice, the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment, the London Review of International Law and her forthcoming monograph Reconsidering REDD+: Law, Power and Authority in the Green Economy is under contract with Cambridge University Press.

Hugo Drochon

Hugo Drochon

Hugo Drochon is a political theorist and historian of political thought at the University of Cambridge, with interests in continental political philosophy, democratic theory, liberalism and political realism. His latest book is Nietzsche’s Great Politics, and he is currently researching elite theories of democracy and their impact on democratic theory. His website can be found here: https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/dr-hugo-drochon

Daniel Gordon

Daniel Gordon

Daniel Gordon is professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Hervier

Hervier

Docteur et agrégé de lettres, enseignant à l’université, Hervier écrit des articles, chroniques et comptes rendus d'ouvrages sur la politique.

Stephen Hopgood

Stephen Hopgood

Stephen Hopgood is Pro-Director (International) at SOAS, University of London, and Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Studies. Most recently, he was co-editor (with Jack Snyder and Leslie Vinjamuri) of the book Human Rights Futures (Cambridge University Press, 2017) in which he has a chapter titled: ‘Human Rights: On the Road to Nowhere.’ He is the author of The Endtimes of Human Rights (Cornell University Press, 2013) and Keepers of the Flame: Understanding Amnesty International (Cornell University Press, 2006). In addition, he has published on US foreign environmental policy, the future of humanitarianism and the Responsibility to Protect.

Travis Knoll

Travis Knoll

Travis Knoll is a PhD candidate in History at Duke University. His current work focuses on Black religion, Catholicism, and affirmative action policy in Brazil.

David Kretz

David Kretz

David Kretz is a graduate student in philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure, and has studied political theory, intellectual history, and literature in Vienna, Berlin, and Paris. He has written for The Point Magazine, Public Seminar, Asymptote Journal, Die Bärliner, and Opium Philosophie. He also contributes regularly to Piqd.de.

Justine Lacroix

Justine Lacroix

Justine Lacroix est professeure de théorie politique à l'Université libre de Bruxelles. Elle est notamment l'auteure de L'Europe en procès. Quel Patriotisme au-delà des nationalismes? (Paris, Cerf, 2004), La pensée française à l'épreuve de l'Europe (Paris, Grasset 2008). Elle a co-édité,avec Kalypso Nicolaïdis, European Stories. Intellectual Debates on Europe in National Contexts (Oxford University Press, 2010). Elle a récemment publié, avec Jean-Yves Pranchère, Le Procès des droits de l'homme. Généalogie du scepticisme démocratique (Paris, Seuil, 2016) qui vient d'être traduit en anglais (Human Rights on Trial, Cambridge University Press, 2018).

Aurore Lambert

Aurore Lambert

Aurore Lambert est secrétaire générale de la Revue française des affaires sociales (https://www.cairn.info/revue-francaise-des-affaires-sociales.htm) et doctorante en science politique à Paris 1. Ses travaux portent sur le capital culturel des élus nationaux.

Olivia Leboyer

Olivia Leboyer

Olivia Leboyer est docteur en science politique et enseigne à Sciences Po Paris. Sa thèse, Elite et Libéralisme, a été publiée en 2012 chez CNRS éditions. Ses recherches actuelles portent sur la confiance au sein de l’armée.

Vincent Lloyd

Vincent Lloyd

Vincent Lloyd is a scholar of religion and political theory teaching at Villanova University. He is currently writing a book about the politics of fatherhood, divine and human.

Lucile Marion

Lucile Marion

Lauréate Fulbright, Lucile Marion enseigne au Linfield College (Oregon). Ses intérêts de recherche portent sur les relations entre philosophie et sciences sociales, tout particulièrement l'histoire, aussi bien que sur les relations réciproques entre théorie (le travail philosophique) et pratique (l'engagement militant). Pour le mémoire de recherche, rédigé dans le cadre du Philmaster (ENS/EHESS), elle a comparé différentes façons d'écrire l'histoire chez Michel Foucault et les historiens des années 1970 en France.

Tommaso Milani

Tommaso Milani

Tommaso Milani has recently obtained a PhD in International History from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His main research interests include the international history of the socialist movement and the emergence of the idea of economic planning in Western Europe.

Sarah Miles

Sarah Miles

Sarah Kathryn Miles is a doctoral student in history at the University of North Carolina. Sarah studies twentieth century global francophone history, particularly the interactions between France and its former colonies including Quebec, Algeria, the French Caribbean, and French West Africa. Her MA thesis will focus on the francophone anti-colonial left in the 1960s and '70s, researching their intellectual productions and unique social networks from Montreal and Paris to Algiers and Dakar.

Samuel Moyn

Samuel Moyn

Samuel Moyn is a Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a Professor of History at Yale University. His areas of interest in legal scholarship include international law, human rights, the law of war, and legal thought, in both historical and current perspective. In intellectual history, he has worked on a diverse range of subjects, especially 20th-century European moral and political theory.

Sarah Rozenblum

Sarah Rozenblum

Diplômée de l'IEP de Paris, Sarah Rozenblum a travaillé à la direction de la recherche du Ministère des Solidarités et de la Santé et dans des cabinets privés. Elle sera à partir de l'automne 2018 doctorante en santé publique et sciences politiques à l'Université du Michigan à Ann Arbor. Son travail en santé publique se double d'un intérêt pour la philosophie et les sciences religieuses, qu'elles a étudiées à l'Ecole normale supérieure et auprès du rabbin Delphine Horvilleur.

Joan Wallach Scott

Joan Wallach Scott

Joan Wallach Scott is Professor Emerita in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study. Her classic, Gender and the Politics of History, has just been reissued in a thirtieth anniversary edition by Columbia University Press. Recent work includes, The Politics of the Veil; The Fantasy of Feminist History; and (forthcoming) Knowledge, Power, and Academic Freedom.

David Sessions

David Sessions

David Sessions is a doctoral candidate in European history at Boston College and a visiting student at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. He previously worked as a journalist and editor, and his writing appears occasionally in The New Republic, Jacobin, and elsewhere. His website can be found here: https://hdavidsessions.wordpress.com/

James Sparrow

James Sparrow

James T. Sparrow is Associate Professor in History and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Warfare State: World War II Americans and the Age of Big Government (Oxford University Press, 2011). With William Novak and Stephen Sawyer he has edited Boundaries of the State in U.S. History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015) and two special issues of the Tocqueville Review on problems of the democratic state. He is currently completing Atomic Liberty: The Problem of the Democratic State in the American Century, a study of how global power transformed conceptions of self-government in the United States from the 1940s to the 1970s.

Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins

Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins

Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins is currently a Visiting Presidential Fellow in the Religion Department at Yale University. He is writing a book for Columbia University Press tentatively titled, The Other Intellectuals: Raymond Aron and the United States. He is on the editorial board of the Tocqueville Review.

Samuel Walker

Samuel Walker

Samuel Walker is an American engaged in graduate studies of philosophy and international relations at the Freie Universität in Berlin, where he also works as an editor and translator.

Patrick Weil

Patrick Weil

Patrick Weil is a historian of immigration and citizenship law, a senior research fellow at the CNRS and the University of Paris 1, and a visiting professor at Yale Law School. His most recent book is Le sens de la République.

Albert Wu

Albert Wu

Albert Wu is assistant professor of history at the American University of Paris. He specializes in the global history of health and religion, and his latest book is From Christ to Confucius, offering a revisionist history of how European missionaries in China went from outspoken opponents of Confucianism to ardent defenders of it.

Levent Yilmaz

Levent Yilmaz

Levent Yilmaz a enseigné l'histoire culturelle et intellectuelle européenne à Istanbul aux universités Bilgi et Koç. Ses recherches portent sur l'historiographie et sur les fondements juridico-politiques de la modernité en Europe. Il a travaillé avec Tullio Gregory (SAS, Fondation San Carlo di Modena) pour son mémoire de MA et avec François Hartog pour son doctorat à l'EHESS. Il y a soutenu en 2002 une thèse sur « La Querelle des Modernes ». Le jury a été composé de Roger Chartier, Marcel Gauchet, Quentin Skinner et Françoise Waquet. Il a également travaillé comme éditeur (Dost, Actes Sud, YKY, Galaade etc.). Il a publié Le Temps Moderne (Gallimard, 2004 ; la version turque, revue et augmentée, Metis, 2010; traductions à paraître en anglais, bulgare, arabe et italien). Il a également dirigé la traduction turque du Dictionnaire des mythologies de Yves Bonnefoy (2 volumes, Dost, 2000) et a publié deux volumes collectifs sur Giambattista Vico (Bilgi U. Press, 2007 et Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 2016). Il était le commissaire de l’exposition rétrospective de Yüksel Arslan au Musée santralistanbul en 2009. Il travaille sur la notion de la nature humaine et de la sociabilité dans les écrits des penseurs politiques (Machiavel, Vitoria, Juste Lipse, Alberico Gentili, Suarez, Grotius, Althusius, Selden, Hobbes, Puffendorf) dans la tradition du droit naturel et historiographie du politique, en mettant l'accent sur l'œuvre du penseur napolitain Giambattista Vico. Il a été Senior Braudel Fellow à l'Institut universitaire européen, Directeur d'études invité à l'EHESS, Mellon Fellow à l'Université Harvard, Villa I Tatti et Fellow de l'Institut d'études avancées de Paris. Il est actuellement membre associé du Centre de recherches historiques de l’EHESS.

Valentine Zuber

Valentine Zuber

Valentine Zuber est Directrice d’études à l’École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE-PSL) titulaire de la chaire de « Religions et relations internationales ». Historienne de formation, elle s’est d’abord spécialisée dans l’histoire de la tolérance religieuse et du pluralisme en Europe. Elle a particulièrement travaillé sur les formes prises la laïcité en France et dans le monde. Elle s’intéresse actuellement aux rapports historiques entretenus entre le christianisme et les droits de l’homme. Elle travaille enfin sur les paradoxes de la défense de la liberté de religion et de conviction dans le monde, dans le cadre de l’universalisation des droits de l’homme.